Presidents and Political Leaders

Listings shown are sorted alphabetically.

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Civil War Governor of Massachusetts

John Andrew – Massachusetts Governor during the Civil War and strong support of Abraham Lincoln. Signed endorsement of a transmittal message with a letter from a Bowdoin College classmate seeking a job. The letter is a copy, Andrew apparently keeping the original. Andrew, expressing pity that a hard working and bright friend would need help requests Col. Browne to approach several key officials, including Sec. Stanton, to find his friend a clerkship. Andrew has signed at the conclusion or the request, which was written by an aide. Heavy folds on two panels from being wrapped around the copy of the original letter and probably filed for a long time. The signature is in fine condition. [#2693]

$100.00
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Superior example of his Executive Mansion card

Chester Arthur –signed Executive Mansion card “Very faithfully Yrs Chester A. Arthur.” This is a better example than most with the added sentiment. Arthur introduced a larger card with an engraved vignette of the White House to answer autograph requests. The switch in card format and his partial term of less than four years makes his signed Executive Mansion cards harder to find than many of his successors. [#5155]

$650.00
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Blanche Bruce signed album page “B.K. Bruce Miss”. Bruce was a former slave who went on to become the first African-American to serve a full term in the United States Senate. The format of an autograph album page and his adding “Mississippi” suggests this was signed while a Senator. There is a portion of a small newspaper article pasted down to the page. On the other side is an autograph from Chicago businessman Potter Palmer, founder of the famed Palmer House Hotel. Bruce is not an easy signature to find and most seem to be on documents rather than anything from the Senate. [#4746]

$150.00
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signed letter and signed envelope

William J. Bryan ALS on a blank sheet to journalist A. J. Stofer. Between events, Bryan pens a quick letter asking to meet with Stofer and lets him know he will soon be back in Washington. The letter is undated but the matching envelope from the Hotel LaFayette in Washington is postmarked Philadelphia October 25, 1921. Bryan addressed the envelope and also signed his name over the return address. There is a small tear at the edge of the envelope running between two letters of his signature.[#4854]

$300.00
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First Lady. ALS on Executive Mansion stationery May 8, 1888. One page letter about going to a concert. Signed in full "Frances F. Cleveland". Silked with some light toning around the edgesedges. Nice display example. [#1870]

$125.00
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Cleveland responds to recommendations regarding an Indian orphanage

Grover Cleveland—ALS as Governor, Sept. 15, 1883 to William Clement Bryant of Buffalo regarding the Thomas Indian Asylum. Cleveland reports that he has not accepted some recommendations from the school’s trustees and asks for a confidential report on the difficulties at the Asylum. The Thomas Orphan Asylum for Indian Children was created to care for orphaned Native American children—mostly Iroquois. It became an embarrassing symbol of warehoused neglect. Bryant was an early historian of American Indians, writing books and many articles on the subject. His work obviously extended to social and cultural support in trying to care of orphaned children.

This is a nice one page Cleveland letter as Governor although the real interest is the reference to Indian Asylum and the unhappy history of government ambivalence, if not neglect, towards orphaned Native children. The left edge is irregularly cut from removing the folded blank pages of the bi-folium sheet and there are two old small remnants of tape on two edges. This is an uncommon example of any piece connecting Cleveland with Native American matters.

William Clement Bryant served as president of the Buffalo City Council and president of the Buffalo Historical Society. He also served as a trustee of the Thomas Indian Asylum.
Charles Marshall was a leading citizen of Buffalo who like Bryant served on the Buffalo Historical Society and served as Trustee, Treasurer and Vice-President of the Orphan Asylum. In 1885 he was adopted into the Seneca Indian nation because of his interest in Native heritage and studies. [# 5102]

[Executive Chamber]
[Albany] Sept 15 [188]3
My dear Sir,

I have lately reviewed the suggestions of yourself and the Mr. Marshall as trustees of the Thomas Indian Asylum. Neither of these have been accepted.

Will you please tell me as confidentially as you desire, just what the difficulty is?

Yours very truly
Grover Cleveland
To Wm. C. Bryant, Esq
Buffalo.

$650.00
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President congratulates Tsar Nicholas II on the birth of his daughter

Grover Cleveland – DS, 4to sheet, January 21, 1896 authorizing the affixing of the seal to a letter of state congratulating Russian Emperor Nicholas II on the birth of his first child, Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna, who was born in November 1895. Tsar Nicholas and his entire family were assassinated in 1918. Warrants to affix seals are often considered lowly, routine presidential documents but they aren’t common after Hayes and this one has unusually nice association connecting Cleveland to the last Tsar of Russia and his family who all disappeared during the Communist revolution. This is in excellent condition on a bifolium sheet, only the first page having and text, with two flattened folds away from Cleveland’s signature. [#5320]

$850.00
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Charles Curtis LS as Hoover’s vice president and first person of American Indian descent (1/4 Kaw) to be elected vice president. Curtis sends King Hostick two signed envelopes (not present). Hostick was a pioneering collector of the early 20th Century, amassing a huge collection largely by writing to people. [#4484]

$200.00
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Franklin Pierce's Attorney Genral

Caleb Cushing – Statesman and Attorney General under President Franklin Pierce. Signed CDV photograph, stamped on the front as coming from photographer Emile Pricam of Geneve (Switzerland). Cushing served as a Congressman from Massachusetts, U. S. minister to China under President Tyler and later as US Minster to Spain under Grant. The CDV is generally clean but mounting traces and some skinning of the paper surface on the blank back side. [#4275]

$125.00
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Eisenhower small 1955 gift card that accompanied a limited number of Christmas gift prints to friends and White House staff. The 4 x 3.25 card by Hallmark carries a gold and blue presidential seal. When opened there is an unsigned pre-printed message from the Eisenhowers. These are quite scarcer than the larger Christmas cards send in 1955. Approximately 1,300 prints of a painting by Ike along with these cards were prepared. It seems that many recipients hung on to prints but discarded the small cards. [#5297]

$350.00
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Ike's Dictionary of French military terms

Eisenhower, Dwight – hardbound French military dictionary signed by Eisenhower at the top of a blank page, with an apparently early signature suggesting it was his own copy. The “Dictionnaire Militaire” was published by the Librairie Militaire Berger-Levrault in 1911. It carries a blind embossed stamp and several internal rubber stamps, a couple crossed out, indicating it was once the property of US Technical Library of Edgewood Arsenal (Maryland). Although Eisenhower was not formally stationed there the cancelled library marks, placement of the signature, lack of inscription or date give every indication the signature was a mark of ownership rather than an autograph for another officer of autograph collector. This would have most likely been acquired by him after WWI when the library had less use for it. The pages are on thin paper with some minor water staining in areas. There is wear to the outer spine and some separation beginning on the cover, which should be repaired. Ike’s signature is strong with some blotting of the “g”. It is an intriguing artifact worthy of additional research. [#5009]

$1,750.00
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Mamie Eisenhower – signed photo, almost certainly as First Lady. This is a nice White House photo. The image is roughly 7.5 x 7.5 printed on heavy paper/light card stock measuring 8 x 10. Mamie has added a large signature running almost the entire length of the border. [#4306]

$125.00
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Everett, Edward – Governor of Mass, Sec. of State, 1860 VP candidate, orator who gave the “featured” speech at Gettysburg. An ALS, 1-1/2 pages, Boston 2/22/1838, regarding attacks made on him by British Journalist Harriet Marineau for Everett's efforts at compromise. [#1866]

$125.00
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Millard Fillmore two page ALS, Buffalo August 10, 1839 to the N.Y. law firm of Graham, Wood & Powers regarding a land sale. He signs as “Millard Fillmore for Fillmore & Haven” his law firm at the time. This is an excellent example of Fillmore’s pre-presidential handwriting and signature written in blue ink in a neat and clear hand and in fine condition. [#5016]

Buffalo Augt. 10, 1839
Gentlemen,
Yours of the 6th inst enclosing a copy of yours to Messrs. Hall and Marshall came to hand this morning. I regret extremely that our inability to attend to your first letter should have caused any inconvenience and embarrassment. Indeed, this business of appraisals and searches is so vexatious, we prefer avoiding it where we can, and do none of it except to accommodate a friend.
I immediately called on Mr. Hall who said that they had done nothing about investigating the title to the land covered by the mortgage of George H. Knight to Henry G. Root for $34,000, and desired us to attend to it. I have ordered a search by the county clerk, and as soon as that is received so as to know against whom to search, I will order the requisite search from the Supreme Court clerk’s office, and will investigate and report on the title with all convenient dispatch.
I have procured Messrs Clary and Clark to make an appraisal which I herewith enclose. Mr Clary I consider one of the best judges of property in the city. Mr. Clark is the principal state appraiser appointed by the Comptroller under the new
[p2] Banking law. I did not let them know my appraisal until they had made theirs. You will perceive that they appraise the land a little higher than I did, and the buildings the same. I filled out one of your printed forms so far as I know the facts & they would warrant and herewith enclose it.
I have personally called at the clerk’s office and enquired of the clerk and all his Deputies and they all concur in the opinion that the assignment from Root to the Bank never came to hand. Mr. Hall says he has received no certificate in relation to this title. Did you send any, except the county clerk’s certificate of this county, coming down to 1828 which you sent to me? If you have others it will save ___ expense and delay of procuring them.
Respectfully Yours
Millard Fillmore
For Fillmore & Haven
Mr--- Graham, Wood & Powers
New York C.

$750.00
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unsigned original full length CDVof Fillmore. The back stamp is from E. Anthony in New York from a photographic negative from “Brady’s National Portrait Gallery” [#3467]

$250.00
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Endorsed check shortly before becoming VP

Gerald R. Ford- endorsed check to the House stationery account. The check written by a supporter is for $6.90 and made out to Ford on June 22, 1973, just a few months before he was confirmed as Vice President under the 25th Amendment. There is one line of light bank stamp endorsement touching a few letters of his signature but the signature is strong and barely effected. Checks, signed or endorsed by modern presidents are difficult to find. [#3399]

$250.00
 
Ford, Gerald R.

-- special presentation copy of his swearing-in remarks as President signed below his color portrait. Printed on high quality stock with a 6 x 8 formal portrait the document measures approximately 19 x 14 and contains the complete but brief remarks offered after taking the Presidential Oath in the East Room. Only a limited number were produced and each personally signed by the president. This attractive broadside is an impressive presidential souvenir and of course is part of one of the most dramatic political stories of Presidential history. [#4806]

$950.00
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Gerald R. Ford – autograph letter, signed with first initial, Vail, CO, Dec 26 [1973] and a signed vice president card. Three weeks after becoming vice president, while vacationing in Vail Co for the holidays, Ford sends an amusing and rare handwritten letter as VP responding to a request. Amazingly, as he explains in his letter he had no supply of VP stationery while in Vail and had to use leftover stationary as the House Minority Leader. In response to a project he sends a signed vice president’s card, which is included and a Senate booklet, which is not present. He concludes the letter with "No Secretary in Vail so this is by my own bad handwriting. J". He signs the uncommon vice president’s card: "Congratulations and best wishes Jerry Ford". Both pieces were written in blue ink which has faded slightly but otherwise in excellent condition.

$1,500.00
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– ALS, Mentor, OH July 26, 1879 to Mrs. Francis Lieber on the front and back of a single 4to sheet of House of Representatives letterhead. Garfield sends a copy of his correspondence with her late husband for a biography. In part: “I am glad to be able to contribute in any way to the Biography of so great and good a man as your late husband. My correspondence with him is among the most pleasant recollections of the past.” Included is a reprint of the 1882 book The Life and Letters of Francis Lieber edited by Thomas Sargent Perry done in consultation with Mrs. Lieber.

Dr. Francis Lieber was one of the leading political philosophers of 19th Century America. Garfield and Lieber had a long-running relationship that included over 100 letters from Garfield. The book includes some of the letters between the two men.

An interesting letter showing the friendship between Garfield and one of the century’s leading intellectuals. It is also a nice example illustrating how Garfield saved and shared his extensive correspondence during his lifetime. [#5100]

$750.00
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Letter to NY Gov. Hugh Carey

LS to New York Governor-Elect Hugh Carey recommending someone for a position in the Governor’s new administration. The December 11, 1974 letter was written as Senator-Elect and is boldly signed in blue. There is a circle drawn around a name in the text, certainly as a reference mark to route Glenn’s letter with the candidate’s application or file. [#4967]

$250.00
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Ulysses S. Grant – signed document as president, April 8, 1875. Grant directs the Sec. of State to affix the seal for the transfer of two fugitives, presumably from state to federal custody. This is worthy of more research into who they were and their offences. The document is unusually clean and fresh with a fold line directly underneath the signature touching the lower strokes of the first and last letters of his signature, almost as if Grant signed along the line. [#5316]

$850.00ON HOLD
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A pair of checks signed by the Hardings. Warren endorses on the back of a check from the Marion County Auditor’s Office in April 1897. Harding’s first run for office was the following year. This is an early example of his signature which is not common prior to becoming a public figure. Florence’s check is drawn on a Marion National Bank check. She fills it in and dates it April 29. The cancellation stamp on the reverse shows the year as 1921, making this less than two months after entering the White House as First Lady.

$600.00
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Protecting the close Pennsylvania vote from fraud

[1840 election of William H. Harrison] Printed circular to Harrison supporters, Philadelphia, Nov. 3, 1840. The circular expresses confidence that Harrison's narrow win in Pennsylvania will stand but warns that Van Buren forces might try to steal the election. Supporters are asked to get their county results, check the returns from each town and the re-check the math. It is signed by Pennsylvania Whig Congressman Charles Naylor and is addressed to George Walker of Woodbourne in Springville, Susquehanna County.

The 1840 presidential election is often considered the first real presidential campaign with widely used campaign memorabilia, populists appeal, and broad public participation in the campaign process to promote favorite candidates. Personal biography and imagery were used to appeal to voting blocks with Harrison portrayed as the "log cabin" candidate in touch with the common person. Apparently it also included field organizations ready to commit or prevent ballot tampering and election fraud.

The Pennsylvania results were the closest in the election with Harrison winning by less than .25% with his 144,010 votes to van Buren's 143,676 votes. Nationally the election wasn't nearly as close with Harrison defeating the incumbent president by 6% of the vote and an Electoral College margin of 234 to 60.

$250.00
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Pair of letters on the press

Hayes, Rutherford B. - an unusually good pair of ALSs giving advice about discretion on being a reporter’s sources signed "Rutherford B. Hayes" and "RBH". Revealing lessons from a seasoned politician who obviously became skeptical of the press.

$1,250.00
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Herbert Hoover – LS as President, April 6, 1929 to Charles Chandler. Less than five weeks after his Inauguration, Hoover thanks an expert on South American Affairs for his book Inter-American Acquaintances. Chandler served in the U.S. Consular Service between 1905 -1913, serving in several South American stations. His study of the region led to the book he sent the new president about the Monroe Doctrine and the history of Pan-American relations. The letter is a nice example, with some good association, of the new president receiving advice about foreign affairs. It is in excellent, fresh condition. [#5326]

$300.00
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Hughes receives the Theodore Roosevelt medal

Chief Justice, Sec. of State, Presidential candidate. Signed letter 10/3/28 to George Kunz acknowledging congratulations on his being awarded the Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished Service Medal for 1928. [#4604]

$150.00
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Johnson mentions the pressure of his Impeachment Trial

Signed letter 4/11/68 on Executive Mansion stationery, 1 page to the historian Harmon C. Westervelt concerning Congressional opposition to Johnson and alluding to the Impeachment. Johnson apologizes in a long delay to Westervelt’s letter two month’s earlier explaining that he was “prevented by the pressure of official duties” i.e. preparing for his Impeachment Trial. He then asks Westervelt to thank Mr. Browne and Hiram Ketchum for of copy of Ketchum’s remarks “so neatly and ingeniously transcribed, delivered in Union Square September 17, 1866.” The power struggle between Radical Republicans in Congress and the Democrat turned Republican president broke out early. Eighteen months prior to this letter a pro-Johnson rally was held in Union Square in New York with Johnson defenders whipping up support for national unity behind the president. It was this rally and a speech by Ketchum that Johnson references in this letter. The feud, of course, culminated in Articles of Impeachment against Johnson. The pressure Johnson was under must have been nearly all-consuming to have left Wersvelt’s letter go un-answered for so long. One week prior to the letter, the case against Johnson in the Senate was wrapped up. Johnson wrote this letter while his defense team was making their case to the Senate between April 9-20, 1868. Johnson presidential letters are few and far between. Those that mention the Impeachment are quite rare. This is a nice example that alludes to the trial but specifically recognizes his supporters who were making a case on his behalf. In excellent condition.

$2,500.00
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John F. Kennedy - 1958 Christmas card with facsimile signature. The 4 3/4 x 5 3/4 card has a wonderful black and white formal photograph of the Kennedy's. John and Jackie are seated and she is holding the infant Caroline on her lap. The inside has the gold Senate seal and a printed message "May the Blessings of Christmas be upon you and yours. Senator and Mrs. John F. Kennedy." It is signed with a printed facsimile signature "Warmest regards - Jack". This is a scarcer card the more common 1959 example. Presidential Christmas cards are becoming very popular. The cards sent by presidents before they moved into the White House are less common and harder to find. [#3104]

$350.00
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1870 Indictment for selling alcohol

William McKinley –early DS as prosecuting attorney for Stark County, May 26, 1870. The document is an indictment against Leo Myers “for keeping rooms of public resort for the sale of intoxicating liquors.” Ohio was one of the first states to try prohibition with a law in 1854. Following the Civil War McKinley studied law and was admitted to the Ohio Bar in 1867. Two years later he was elected to his first office as Prosecuting Attorney (District Attorney) of Stark County. McKinley signs the indictment “William McKinley Jr.” There is some archival reinforcement of the fold which does not affect this uncommonly early McKinley signature.

$400.00
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Patricia Nixon signed letter on White House stationery, June 2, 1972 signed "Pat Nixon" to Virginia Sherwood expressing sympathy on the death of her son, along with the White House envelope. [#4708]

$125.00
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2 High School yearbooks and Duke Law directory

Richard Nixon group of yearbooks from the two high schools he attend and a student directory from Duke Law. The 1930 Whittier Union High School yearbook, the Cardinal and White, carries several photos of Nixon. Photos range from single head shots as a graduating senior, officer of the class to several group shots as a member of various clubs and school groups. There is also a photo of Nixon’s first girlfriend, Ola Florence Welch. The book is in good condition with autographs throughout but none by Nixon. The owner apparently was friendly with almost everyone in the class-except the future president. Nixon was the business manager of the yearbook and responsible for selling many of the ads that are in the back. It isn’t surprising that one full page ad is from the Associated Banks of Whittier, including Bank of America that was headed by Herman Perry, the man who approached Nixon 15 years later to run for Congress.

Nixon first two years of high school were in Fullerton Union High School. The second book is the 1928 yearbook Pleiades where Nixon was a sophomore. There are two group pictures of the sophomore class and Nixon presumably is in one of those. More interesting though is the short report from that class is making its own mark. IT mentions two class members by name, one being Nixon for winning the oratorical contest against two seniors. He is also singled out again for special mention on the Forensics Club page. This is a rarer find than the Whittier book. Over the years collectors and book dealers might be more aware of the Nixon connection than they would be with a Fullerton yearbook.

The third book is a small directory of Faculty, Administration and students of Duke University. There are no photos and a simple one line listing of Nixon’s school residence and home town.

A rare grouping of books related to Nixon’s youth and life before politics.

$950.00
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Scarce White House letter on smut and pornography

Richard Nixon signed letter, White House, April 30, 1969 to Journalist Merriman Smith. Nixon congratulates Smith on some comments about "smut peddlers" and signs it with his initials "RN". Very early into his Presidency Nixon resorted to signing almost all of his letters with his initials. Merriman Smith was one of the most respected journalist of the 1960's, perhaps gaining his greatest fame as an on the scene reporter at the Kennedy assassination. This is a wonderful letter reflecting Nixon's unease with pornography and sex during the tumultuous '60's when the courts were striking down laws against pornography. It is also a nice example of Nixon trying to develop positive relations with the media in quiet ways like these personal notes recognizing a particular article or statement. The original mailing envelope is included. [#3913]

$650.00
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Richard Nixon –ALS on personal stationery, 8/5/93 to Bob Nesen, signed with his initials “RN”. He thanks his long-time friend and former diplomat for the use of a Cadillac. The car was probably for one of his last trips home to California with his daughters. In part: “As we road [sic] around the Santa Barbara area in one of your Cadillacs, Tricia, Julie and I remarked about how fortunate we have been to have known you as a friend and a loyal supporter over the years…” Pat Nixon had been buried just six weeks earlier at the Nixon birthplace in Yorba Linda and he would die in New York just eight months later.

The letter is in very good condition with minor traces of mounting tape at the very top and bottom edges. It is a nice example of Nixon’s odd tendency in handwritten letters to funnel his writing with each line slightly indented from the line above. The impulse was probably to fill a page without having to write more than he had to say.

$1,200.00
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Warning of a noted economistís ties to Communist groups.

Richard Nixon - LS, January 20, 1948 “Dick” to Charles Cooper. Twenty-one years to the day before he would be president, Nixon writes about the work that propelled him into the national spotlight as a leading opponent of Communism. Late in 1947 while in his first term in Congress, Nixon was appointed to the House Un-American Activities Committee. In the summer of 1948 the Hiss-Chamber’s case erupted and Nixon’s national reputation was born.

Nixon passes along information from the House Committee to Charles Cooper and Herman Perry about Scott Nearing “because he has a long record of Communist front activities”. Nearing was a prominent Socialist, economist, and pacifist. His published works and lectures on pacifism during World War I resulted in criminal prosecution for interfering with recruitment of soldiers. There are typical folds and handling of the letter but it would be hard to find a better example of Nixon’s early red-hunting of prominent figures.
[#4908]

$950.00
 
Signed by 5 Presidents
Presidents signed photo
George W. Bush as President

Color photo of the North Portico of the White House matted and signed by 5 Presidents with an autopen of Ronald Reagan. Gerald Ford and Richard Nixon both added their Presidential numbers and George H. Bush dated it, as President. George H. W. Bush and Jimmy Carter added large felt tip signatures. There is room for additional signatures. Some bumps at edges but makes for a dramatic display piece.

$2,500.00
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White House card signed with a nicely centered attractive, clean signature.

$200.00
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1942 Christmas gift

1942 presidential Christmas gift, a a Defense Bonds stamp folder. Inside the folder is a paper album with 75 spaces for .25 cent bond stamps. These booklets were issued by the government to encourage Americans to buy bonds that were necessary for supporting the war effort. When an album was filled it could be redeemed for a $25 bond at the cost of $18.75. There are two stamps in the album.

Mary Evans Seeley’s reference book Seasons Greetings From The White House indicates that this gift to the White House staff included one stamp from the President. The recipient of this one added only one more, making this a nearly mint, unused book. Seeley does not provide a count of how many of these were distributed but she does point out that only 300 people received gifts in 1943. Few of these have survived almost none will be in as nice condition as this one.

$950.00
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Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt -signed photo, Christmas 1941, 8 x 10 slightly trimmed. The photo shows Franklin and Eleanor seated at a table in Hyde Park with “Christmas 1941” written in to the image at the edge of the table. The print has been personally signed “Eleanor Roosevelt” and “Franklin Roosevelt”. These signed photographs were gifts to the White House staff in 1941.

Mary Seeley’s book on Presidential cards and gifts: Season’s Greetings From The White House states there were 404 of these signed photos given to staff. They were originally presented in gift folders and measured 11 x 14. This example was removed form the folder. Glue remnants of the folder mounting remain on the reverse side. The image has been irregularly trimmed on the edges—probably to fit an earlier frame. On the reverse is a notation, in an unidentified hand, “To ____ while working at White House.”

Presidential gifts, particularly signed gift cards, are becoming very popular and harder to find. Although not in its original folder this is still a very nice example with only a few minor and irrelevant hairline creases in a couple corners. Eleanor signed in a light blue ink and most of the surviving pieces carry faded and poor examples of her signature. This is a particularly strong example of her signature on one of these prints. Dual signatures, particularly on photos together, of the most famous and longest serving 20th century President and First Lady are quite uncommon, which adds to the value of these special photographs.

$3,500.00
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TR tries to recruit the Roosevelt Dvision for WW I

-LS, July 27, 1916 on Metropolitan stationery to Admiral Seaton Schroeder. In this brief note Roosevelt tells Schroeder that any son of his would be welcome in a Roosevelt Division. After the US entered World War Roosevelt lobbied Congress and President Wilson to be given a command of some troops in Europe. Congress even passed a law for his benefit to allow volunteer divisions to be deployed. Roosevelt went so far as to begin recruiting volunteers to serve under him. Wilson finally declined TR’s offer. No doubt he sensed that sending the aged and bombastic former president into battle would create more political problems than military victories. This letter suggests Roosevelt was actively laying plans for a volunteer force well before the US even entered the war. Ironically, Seaton Schroeder, who served in the Civil War and rose to the rank of Rear Admiral in the Spanish American War, was called back to service in World War I. [#5074]

$950.00
 
FDR speechwriter and screenwriter
Sherwood, Robert

Playwright, screenwriter, FDR speechwriter. Signed letter, Dec. 1947, mentioning his firend the poet Arthur Guiterman. #4145

$75.00
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juggling politics and patronage

William H. Taft - LS 9/9/09 from Beverly, MA on White House stationery to the Walter Dickey, influential publisher and Chairman of the Missouri Republican Party. Taft tries to explain his way around an obviously difficult bind on patronage. The letter is on the front and back page of folded bifolium White House stationery. There is a rubber stamp docket in the upper right corner on the front and some mounting traces with paper remnants on the lower blank half of the back page with Taft's signature. The letter offers an interesting look into Taft's handling of intramural party struggles over local patronage.

$400.00
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Martin Van Buren – ALS, November 1818, 1st and 2nd pages on a bifolium sheet. Van Buren writes to John V. Henry about some legal matters. At the time Van Buren was an established attorney but just starting his long political career as a member of the New York Senate. This carries a nice example of his early signature with a clearly distinct middle initial “v.” As he became more prominent his handwriting became more rushed and illegible and the signature became a blended “VanBuren” There is foxing and spotting throughout with a small loss of paper in the upper right corner but all writing is strong. [#5314]

$750.00
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Vice Presidents- group lot of four pieces signed by 6 vice presidents. The major piece in the lot is an album page signed by Calvin Coolidge as president and his vice-president Charles Dawes as well as Charles Curtis who would later serve as Hoover’s VP. The page contains other signatures including Senators William Borah (ID), George W. Norris (NE), Walter Edge (NJ), Lawrence Phipps (CO). It is dated by a collector in pencil April 26, 1926 with some margin notations indicating the offices of the signers. A very nice grouping of three successive VP’s on one sheet. Other pieces include Henry Wallace- VP under FDR- LS 1953 congratulating someone for not being affiliated with a political party; Nelson Rockefeller as Governor, LS 1965 responding to an autograph request; Spiro Agnew as VP, inscribed photo with large VP envelope.

$550.00
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FDR's 2nd VP transitions to the Cabinet

Henry Wallace, Vice President under FDR during WWII and a candidate for President in 1948 as the Progressive Party nominee. Signed letter “H.A. Wallace” on Commerce Dept. stationery 4/5/45 to Harold Thompson. Wallace responds to a congratulatory letter from a friend apologizing for the delay in responding. FDR had offered the position to his former vice president but of course died just weeks into his new administration. Truman made good on the offer and appointed him as one of his first acts as the new president. Wallace explains the heavy flow of mail and lack of help between his leaving office and assuming the new position. [#4865]

$90.00
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Daniel Webster – Sec. of State, Senator. Two page ALS, on a 4to bifolium sheet, with cover leaf addressed by Webster. Webster tries to amicable mediate a dispute between Samuel Upton and a Mr. Thayer. This is probably the Boston banker John Eliot Thayer who provided financial support to the family late in Webster’s life. Samuel Upton was a prominent businessman and in Massachusetts and Maine, where he also edited the Bangor Gazette newspaper. Nice association between local figures. The letter is in very good condition with the typical folds. [#5329]

$450.00
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Wilson looks to the Churches to restore post-war America

Signed letter April 22, 1923, 4to, personal stationery. Wilson writes to Rev. Smith of Haverhill, Mass concerning a church resolution. In part: “…The churches can, and I hope will, do a vast deal of good in leading the country back to the high levels from which it has descended since the war.” Signed in full with an unusually dark signature and an uncommonly good content letter reflecting on post-war conditions in America. [#2196]

$750.00
 
Wilson, Woodrow

Woodrow Wilson – beautiful, fresh looking World War I commission of Paul L. Reed as a Civil Engineer in the Navy with the rank of Commander. It is dated Sept. 9. 1917. Wilson’s signature is strong and dark, as his that of Josephus Daniels as Secretary of the Navy. The document stands out as fresh and clean with some signs of flattened lines from having once been rolled, but not folded. The blue seal is intact and the engravings are crisp and bright. The large format commission has been matted and framed with a nice gold and black frame. The frame shows some age but is still strong and ready to be hung as a striking display piece. Replacement framing of the same quality would probably run $400-$500. Overall an exceptionally nice example of a World War I Wilson commission.

$550.00